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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> we must not permit and artificial debt ceiling to throw the country into default and our economy into chaos and depression, which is exactly what the republicans are threatening to do. jon: some conservative groups warn that removing the limit is a recipe for economic disaster, as we're seeing now in greece. the leaders of heritage action family research council and club for growth writing in an op ed they want congress to balance the budget within ten years and keep it balanced. quote, no american should have to tell an eight-year-old child that we cannot get our nation's house in order by the time she goes to college. there are many ways to get to a d republicans haved both an obligation to explain what path they will choose. jonah goldberg is editor at large for national review online, he's also a fox news contributor. get rid of the debt ceiling all together? jonah, what do you think about that idea? >> well i don't think it's a disaster if we got rid of the debt ceiling but i'm not in favor of getting rid of the debt ceiling. most countries don't have a debt ceiling. you sti
that we have a uniform rule of economy gent circumstances. that, her suggestion complies with your objection. >> well, if i'm understanding it correctly, i think our point is this, which is that the police officers have to act reasonably in the situation. in the situation they know for sure the evidence is going to be lost, they know that every minute is critical, for example -- >> so many situations in which we require a warrant, nevertheless. when there's drug dealing in a house, every time -- it's almost a certainty that they're going to use the drugs, and that evidence is going to disappear. you rely on knowing that there's likely to be telltale signs left over. and that's the same thing you do in an alcohol situation. you rely on the testimony of the police officer, you rely on the implied consent presumption. it's not as if this is destruction of all evidence. and not like a fleeing situation where someone gets away, you have nothing left. this is vastly different. >> i mean, with respect we disagree. this evidence is critical, and the number matters. i mean, it is the case t
is a bundle of joy for california's economy. a future worker. a future taxpayer, and a future buyer for your home. trouble is, there aren't enough women having babies. that spells potential crisis for the future of the state. >> i want to get married, have a career, all these things. most of my friends feel the same way. i think our generation wants to wait longer. we don't really see ourselves with kids in our 20s. >> maybe it's the economy. people with making sure they have enough for themselves first. >> we peaked in california in 1990. >> reporter: dell myers from usc sees a convergence of troubling trends. on top of a declining birthrate, there is a growing senior population. that means a shortage of doctors and caregivers in the supply pipeline to serve the aging. >> basically, there's almost twice as many seniors now per working-age person, or there will will, than tha there have been traditionally. >> reporter: aggravating factors are declining education opportunities and a higher cost of living in california. fewer people are coming to the state, including undocumented workers. myer
for market, sellers and buyers and the economy overall. >> reporter: we're not there right now? >> we're really hot. >> reporter: too hot? >> i think so. too hot to sustain. >> reporter: a lot of factors influence that median price including artificially low interest rates and buyers feeling pressure to bid ever higher. the fear is that the whole thing could collapse again. nobody wants to go back to 2009. but the warnings are there. if the market gets too hot, somebody could get burned. in concord, john ramos, cbs 5. >> the industry experts predict the higher prices will eventually lead to more inventory for sale. to see the housing numbers broken down county by county go to our website, cbssf.com. click on news. >>> a barber and father of a five-year-old girl is the first homicide victim of the year in san jose. cbs 5 reporter elissa harrington shows us the victim's family is turning to the public in their quest for answers. >> we don't want to wake up every morning asking the same question, why and who? >> reporter: why 34-year-old ivan segur
's economy. i think as bill said a moment ago, the islamists have been present in algeria for some time. 20 years ago they won the elections there. the military had to come in to take over the government to prevent them from assuming power. this phenomenon didn't happen overnight. it has been building in the arab world. rise of fundamentalist islam, the rise of radical politicized islam. we've seen its manifestation in a number of different ways including al qaeda. but it is broad and it's deep and the idea we can simply say as we've done the past four years the on terror is over, al qaeda is defeated, we don't have to worry about it, we can cut our defense budget without limit, we're seeing right now, right in front of us the danger of this kind of thinking. martha: what should we do? you know, if americans are still being held and this is a very fuzzy situation right now what should the reaction be? >> i think we need to get some clarity what's going on the ground but i think what it also shows you can't wait for this kind of event to happen before you plan in advance. i think we blindsid
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)